Derick RethansPHP Internals News: Episode 54: Magic Method Signatures (21.5.2020, 08:17 UTC)

PHP Internals News: Episode 54: Magic Method Signatures

In this episode of "PHP Internals News" I chat with Gabriel Caruso (Twitter, GitHub, LinkedIn) about the "Ensure correct signatures of magic methods" RFC.

The RSS feed for this podcast is https://derickrethans.nl/feed-phpinternalsnews.xml, you can download this episode's MP3 file, and it's available on Spotify and iTunes. There is a dedicated website: https://phpinternals.news

Transcript

Derick Rethans 0:16

Hi, I'm Derick, and this is PHP internals news, a weekly podcast dedicated to demystifying the development of the PHP language. This is Episode 54. Today I'm talking with Gabriel Caruso about his ensure correct signatures of magic methods RFC. Hello Gabriel, would you please introduce yourself?

Gabriel Caruso 0:37

Hello Derick and hello to everyone as well. My name is Gabriel. I'm from Brazil, but I'm currently in the Netherlands. I'm working in a company called Usabila, which is basically a feedback company. Yeah, let's talk about this new RFC for PHP eight.

Derick Rethans 0:52

Yes, well, starting off at PHP eight. Somebody told me that you also have some other roles to play with PHP eight.

Gabriel Caruso 0:59

Yeah, I think last week I received the news that I'm going to be the new release manager together with Sara. We're going to basically take care of PHP eight, ensuring that we have new versions, every month that we have stable versions every month free of bugs, we know that it's not going to happen.

Derick Rethans 1:17

That's why there's a release cycle with alphas and betas.

Gabriel Caruso 1:20

Yeah.

Derick Rethans 1:21

I've been through this exactly a year early, of course, because I'm doing a seven four releases.

Gabriel Caruso 1:25

Oh, nice. Yeah. So I'm gonna ask a lot of questions for you.

Derick Rethans 1:29

Oh, that's, that's fine. It's also the role of the current latest release manager to actually kickstart the process of getting the PHP, in this case, PHP eight release managers elected. Previously, there were only very few people that wanted to do it. So in for the seven four releases it was Peter and me. But in your case, there were four people that wanted to do it, which meant that for the first time I can ever remember we actually had to hold some form of election process for it. That didn't go as planned because we ended up having a tie twice, which was interesting. So we had to run a run off election for the second person between you and Ben Ramsey, that's going to go continuing for you for the next three and a half years likely.

Gabriel Caruso 2:11

Yep.

Derick Rethans 2:12

So good luck with that.

Gabriel Caruso 2:13

Thank you. Thank you very much.

Derick Rethans 2:15

In any case, let's get back to the RFC that we actually wanted to talk about today, which is the ensure correct signatures of magic methods RFC. What are these magic methods?

Gabriel Caruso 2:24

So PHP, let's say out of the box, gives the user some magic methods that every single class have it. We can use that those methods for anything, but basically, what magic methods are are just methods that are called by PHP w

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Derick RethansPHP Internals News: Episode 53: Constructor Property Promotion (14.5.2020, 08:16 UTC)

PHP Internals News: Episode 53: Constructor Property Promotion

In this episode of "PHP Internals News" I chat with Nikita Popov (Twitter, GitHub, Website) about the Constructor Property Promotion RFC.

The RSS feed for this podcast is https://derickrethans.nl/feed-phpinternalsnews.xml, you can download this episode's MP3 file, and it's available on Spotify and iTunes. There is a dedicated website: https://phpinternals.news

Transcript

Derick Rethans 0:16

Hi, I'm Derick. And this is PHP internals news, a weekly podcast dedicated to demystifying the development of the PHP language. This is Episode 53. Today I'm talking with Nikita Popov about a few RFCs that he's made in the last few weeks. Let's start with the constructor property promotion RFC.

Nikita Popov 0:36

Hello Nikita, would you please introduce yourself? Hi, Derick. I am Nikita and I am doing PHP internals work at JetBrains and the constructor promotion, constructor property promotion RFC is the result of some discussion about how we can improve object ergonomics in PHP.

Derick Rethans 0:56

Object economics. It's something that I spoke with Larry Garfield about two episodes ago, where we discuss Larry's proposal or overview of what can be improved with object ergonomics in PHP. And I think we mentioned that you just landed this RFC that we're now talking about. What is the part of the object ergonomics proposal that this RFC is trying to solve?

Nikita Popov 1:20

I mean, the basic problem we have right now is that it's a bit more inconvenient than it really should be to use simple value objects in PHP. And there is two sides to that problem. One is on the side of writing the class declaration, and the other part is on the side of instantiating the object. This RFC tries to make the class declaration simpler, and shorter, and less redundant.

Derick Rethans 1:50

At the moment, how would a typical class instantiation constructor look like?

Nikita Popov 1:55

Right now, if we take simple examples from the RFC, we have a class Point, which has three properties, x, y, and Zed. And each of those has a float type. And that's really all the class is. Ideally, this is all we would have to write. But of course, to make this object actually usable, we also have to provide a constructor. And the constructor is going to repeat that. Yes, we want to accept three floating point numbers x, y, and Zed as parameters. And then in the body, we have to again repeat that, okay, each of those parameters needs to be assigned to a property. So we have to write this x equals x, this y equals y, this z equals z. I think for the Point class this is still not a particularly large burden. Because we have like only three properties. The names are nice and short. The types are really short. We don't have to write a lot of code, but if you have larger classes with more properties, with more constructor arguments, with larger and more descriptive names, and also larger and more descriptive type names, then this makes up for quite a bit of boilerplate code.

Derick Rethans 3:16

Because you're pretty much having the properties' names in there three times.

Nikita Popov 3:20

Four times even. One is the property name and the declaration, one in the parameter, and then you have to the assignment has to repeat it twice.

Derick Rethans 3:30

You're repeating the property names four times, and the types twice.

Nikita Popov 3:34

Right.

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