SitePoint PHPFirst Look at Yahoo’s MySQL Performance Analyzer (4.9.2015, 16:00 UTC)

When you deploy an app to production servers, you may experience some database problems as your data grows. Some tools can help you debug and solve your problems, like MysqlTuner, Percona, etc. In this article, we’re going to explore the Yahoo MySql performance analyzer and see what the main features are.

Vector illustration of gauge with pointer in the red, indicating speed

Installation

The analyzer uses SNMP when available, so it’s a good idea to have it installed on your database server.

Because this is a JAVA application, make sure you have JDK installed before proceeding. It requires version 8 to run, but version 7 is fine since it doesn’t use any of version 8’s features. You can read more in the readme file in the repo.

I have a demo application on my Vagrant box, and I will install the analyzer in the root of my application. Let’s start by logging into our machine using ssh and cloning the repository.

vagrant ssh
git clone git@github.com:yahoo/mysql_perf_analyzer.git myperf

To build the application, you need to run the mvn clean package command. After the build process is done, you’ll find a myperfserver-server.zip file under the perfJettyServer/target directory. Move that file to a new directory on your server and extract it. The resulting output contains start_myperf.sh and stop_myperf.sh scripts to manage the server. Let’s use the start script to launch the application. You can read more about the available options in the repo.

Managing Users

After starting the server, open your browser using your machine hostname and the specified port (vaprobash.dev:9092/myperf). You can log in with the default admin account (username: myperf, password: change).

Continue reading %First Look at Yahoo’s MySQL Performance Analyzer%

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PHP: Hypertext PreprocessorPHP 5.6.13 is available (4.9.2015, 00:00 UTC)
The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 5.6.13. 11 security-related issues were fixed in this release. All PHP 5.6 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version. For source downloads of PHP 5.6.13 please visit our downloads page, Windows binaries can be found on windows.php.net/download/. The list of changes is recorded in the ChangeLog.
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PHP: Hypertext PreprocessorPHP 5.5.29 is available (4.9.2015, 00:00 UTC)
The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 5.5.29. This is a security release. Many security-related issues were fixed in this release. All PHP 5.5 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version. For source downloads of PHP 5.5.29 please visit our downloads page, Windows binaries can be found on windows.php.net/download/. The list of changes is recorded in the ChangeLog.
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PHP: Hypertext PreprocessorPHP 5.4.45 Released (4.9.2015, 00:00 UTC)
The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 5.4.45. Ten security-related issues were fixed in this release. All PHP 5.4 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version. For source downloads of PHP 5.4.45 please visit our downloads page, Windows binaries can be found on windows.php.net/download/. The list of changes is recorded in the ChangeLog. Please note that according to the PHP version support timelines, PHP 5.4.45 is the last scheduled release of PHP 5.4 branch. There may be additional release if we discover important security issues that warrant it, otherwise this release will be the final one in the PHP 5.4 branch. If your PHP installation is based on PHP 5.4, it may be a good time to start making the plans for the upgrade to PHP 5.5 or PHP 5.6.
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SitePoint PHPPHP Summer Camp 2015 Review (3.9.2015, 16:00 UTC)

You’re standing on a long pier, the last ten meters of which curiously belong to international waters despite being well inside the current country’s territory. As you climb the meter-high rock wall that forms a small barrier towards the west, you’re able to witness the sun dipping into the sea, far in the distance. Soft waves caress the rocky surface below your feet, bobbing the sea urchins and fish to and fro. There are other people there, each immersed in their own thoughts.

Rovinj sunset

No, that’s not a Dungeons and Dragons session starting. It’s the end of a great conference of workshops in Rovinj, Croatia, in the same spirit as last year’s.

PHP Summer Camp 2015

PHP Summer Camp is a dual event comprising of two PHP tracks and one eZ Publish track, the workshops of which are collectively called EZ Summer Camp. This year’s event took place slightly earlier than last year’s - from August 26th to 29th.

I attended in an entirely unofficial capacity this year. With zero responsibility on site, it was quite a different experience. This year’s key takeaways from the conference itself are:

  • Doctrine is less complicated than it seems, just awkwardly documented
  • Blackfire is less complicated than it seems, just awkwardly documented
  • More people need to read Ross Tuck’s guide to conference speaking
  • Puli is either the next game changer or the next big flop
  • If you’re only attending conferences you get invited to (and your schedule is not packed with those invites), you’re not a good member of the community
  • Tech people can and do have fun and interesting conversations in bars without getting drunk and awkward, contrary to popular belief.

Continue reading %PHP Summer Camp 2015 Review%

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Thijs FerynRunning varnishstat remotely using an API written in Go (3.9.2015, 09:32 UTC)
Varnish is one of my favorite pieces of technology. It’s a reverse caching proxy that makes slow websites go fast. It
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PHP ClassesReview: Laravel 5 Essentials (3.9.2015, 01:10 UTC)
Laravel 5 Essentials
Title
Reviewer
Lopo Lencastre de Almeida
Category
PHP books
Publisher
Packt
Author
Martin Bean
Summary
This book was a bit of an unexpected surprise. For its seven chapters and just 118 pages I was expecting less than I got. Of course, this is just an introductory book so do not expect it to have it all about Laravel 5.

Neverthless, if you are willing to know more about what modern PHP programming and Laravel is or just want to get a fast update on what's new in its version 5, then you should read "Laravel 5 Essentials".

Laravel is one of the most exciting of the newer PHP frameworks and it will gain market share in the near future. It's already the most starred PHP framework on Github and that says a lot about its popularity, so you should really consider to have it as one of your expertise areas.

This book is, for sure, is a must have and a very good starting point for all PHP newcomers and old Laravel developers.
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Anna FilinaCreating Courses and Talks with Mind Maps (2.9.2015, 14:05 UTC)

Many people are intrigued when I say that I am able to cut my course and talk preparation time by roughly 70% using mind maps.

The first instinct is to write slides, but that is wrong. Slides are linear. With the ability to make transitions, add pictures and express ideas in full sentences, they are a distraction to the flow of thoughts.

How Mind Maps Help?

Mind maps remove distractions and enable you to focus on getting ideas out of your head. Your thoughts are not linear and mind maps accommodate that. You can see everything at a glance. You can jump from one topic to the next, make changes, rearrange, etc.

Planning is the most important thing. A good plan means that more than half of the work is done, since you’ll less likely to backtrack. It’s much quicker to make changes to a mind map than to a nearly-completed course or presentations.

Process Suggestion

I start with assertions about the audience. Are they developers? What is their skill level? What do they expect to get from this? Then, I write a conclusion to match those expectations. Yes, straight to the conclusion. I can’t plot a route without the destination.

I fill in the major topics. I sequence them in a way to tell a story that will progressively lead the audience to the conclusion. I read the topics out loud, linking them as I speak. Is the order coherent? Does it sound like an interesting story? I rearrange as needed.

Then I fill in with sub-topics. It’s okay to write more content than necessary. I can delete some later. Oftentimes, this part requires me to do some research about best practices, because they evolve every day. Once this is done, I quickly read everything out loud, because that’s how I spot inconsistencies and missing links. I refine the topics, delete those that add too little value and re-read once more.

At this point, the content is solid and I can write the slides, or whatever support material I need. That part is usually much, much shorter than the mind map planning. I probably spend most of that time finding good stock photos.

Things to Watch Out For

Write your points using as few words as possible. Avoid full sentences. It’s supposed to be a reminder, not a novel. It’s a map of what’s in your mind, not a full brain dump.

If you must write down the many ideas that you don’t want to forget, make sure that they’re in their own branch so that you can collapse that branch. This way, you have the ideas for later, but keep your mind map lean.

Conclusion

Mind maps are a powerful tool that will help you do things faster and increase quality. Try to use mind maps for everything: blog posts, functional requirements, vacation planning, etc. I actually used a mind map to write this post about mind maps.Mind maps

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Cal EvansInterview with Anthony Ferrara (1.9.2015, 13:08 UTC) Link
PHP ClassesSentiment Analysis in PHP Part 2: Applying the Solution in Practice (1.9.2015, 07:30 UTC)
By Samuel Adeshina
In the first part of this article we learned about the theory of analyzing a text to determine the sentiments expressed by the user that wrote it.

Read this article to learn to how to implement a sentiment analysis application in practice based on the PHP Sentiment Analyzer class.
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